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Showing posts from March, 2020

Theatrical by Magggie Harcourt

A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula Le Guin

My Story Suffragette by Carol Drinkwater

2011, Dollie tells her own story through her diary.She is a young girl who used to live in the slums.She is given a chance in life and adopted by a rich family who make their money from the docks. She becomes involved with Women’s Suffrage and Political Union. The text makes the difference between suffragettes and suffragists quite clear. We read some gruesome details of how women were imprisoned and what happened when they went on hunger strike. Dollie herself is imprisoned and is force-fed.She is also present at the Derby at the Epsom race course on the 4 June 1913 where Emily Wilding Davison throws herself down in front of the king’s horse. Emily died of her injuries on 9 June 2013. At the end of the book is a useful timeline and there are also some intriguing photos. The author provides some historical notes. This is one of a series of “My Story” books where history is brought to us through the voices of young people.

Flambards by K M Peyton

Only Remembered edited by Michael Morpurgo

2014
This is an edited collection of commentary on World War I, or the Great War. It consists of short articles by influential people such as politicians, writers, actors and producers – and most quote some fiction though this is rarely children’s fiction.
It is a little surprising , then, to find it in the children’s section of the local library and one can’t help wondering whether it is simply the name Michael Morpurgo that has caused that to happen.  On the other hand, this is still very readable by the upper primary and lower secondary child. Each section is short and thought-provoking. The book would also be useful in the classroom where the Great War is being discussed.
The articles are grouped into three sections: At War, At Home and After.
Ian Beck’s illustrations enliven the text.  Between them, the texts offer a balanced view.

Don’t Stop Thinking About the Future

Tulip Taylor Take Another Look by Anna Mainwaring